Salute to Excellence

  • The scientific impact of Dr. André Barbeau is reflected in his publication of 442 articles and 30 books, while receiving 10 national and international prizes and being elected president of more than 121 learned societies, congresses, foundations.

    The scientific impact of Dr. André Barbeau is reflected in his publication of 442 articles and 30 books, while receiving 10 national and international prizes and being elected president of more than 121 learned societies, congresses, foundations.

  • Researcher: H.J.M. Barnett, MD

    In the 1960s, two neurosurgeons – one an American and the other a Swiss – in experimental animals were able to join the scalp arteries to the cortical arteries lying on the surface of the brain. Using an operating microscope and extremely fine sutures (about the diameter of a human hair), they determined that it was possible to divert blood from muscles of the scalp into the arteries lying on the surface of the brain.

  • Researcher: Jules Hardy, OC, CQ, MD

    The pituitary is the master endocrine gland directly connected to the brain. It controls all the hormone secretions which are responsible for the most important functions of the human body: birth, growth, puberty, sexual drive, reproduction, feeding, comfort, emotional behaviour, menopause and aging.

  • Researcher: Alan R. Hudson, MB, FRCSC & Susan E. Mackinnon, MD, FRCSC

    The sciatic nerve is approximately the width of three lead pencils placed side-by-side and contain many thousands of axons. The axons convey messages from the spinal cord to the muscles and other axons convey messages in the opposite direction, taking information from the skin to the spinal cord. Thus, if the nerve is irreparably damaged, the muscles supplied by that nerve will not be able to work, and the area of the skin supplied by that nerve will be anaesthetic.

  • Researcher: Dr. Ronald Melzack

    Specificity theory states, simply, that pain is due to nerve impulses that are produced by an injury and are transmitted directly to a pain centre in the brain. Pain, in other words, is supposed to be proportional to the extent of the injury. This simple relation does not hold up, however.

  • Researcher: Barry J. Sessle, MDS, PhD

    In 20 years of study, remarkable progress has been made towards clarifying the processes in the brain that underlie acute and chronic pain in the face, mouth and jaws and the brain mechanisms involved in the control of the pain transmission process.

  • Researcher: John V. Basmajian, OC, O.ONT, MD, FRCPC, FACA, FSBM, FABMR, FACRM

    Dr. Basmajian is a world pioneer of research into muscle control mechanisms in health and disease. Working with polio patients at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto after World War II, he was among the first to develop electronic laboratory methods of studying muscle function known as "electromyography".

  • Researcher: Dr. Charles Sorbie

    The human elbow joint is a complicated one. Three bones are involved and the contact surfaces have complex surface shapes. Like most joints, the ends of the bones in the elbow are covered with a layer of cartilage. The cartilage is easily destroyed by injury and by arthritis. If that should happen, a lot of pain and stiffness will develop in the joint.

    In collaboration with Mr. Gerald Saunders, Professor Henk Wevers, Mr. David Siu and Dr. Ryoichi Shiba

  • Researcher: Dr. Charles Sorbie

    Canada does not have an implant industry of its own. Surgeons and scientists at Queen's University have persuaded a company based in Lyons, France to relocate to Kingston so that collaboration will allow the development of research and manufacture human implants particularly joint replacements.

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