Future Health Featured Articles

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  • Researchers directed by Dr. Laurent Mottron at the University of Montreal's Centre for Excellence in Pervasive Development Disorders (CETEDUM) have determined that people with autism concentrate more brain resources in the areas associated with visual detection and identification, and conversely, have less activity in the areas used to plan and control thoughts and actions. This might explain...

  • The mystery began in 1976. Adolfo Pampena was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer that caused a strange combination of symptoms and was associated with the occurrence of multiple tumours in his stomach and colon. His medical team was stumped and was unable to answer the most important questions for him and his family: the cause of his disease and the risk for future generations.

    Now,...

  • University Professor Emeritus Ernest McCulloch, one of the fathers of stem cell research, died January 20 at 84, leaving a brilliant research legacy.

    Fifty years ago, he and University Professor Emeritus James Till broke new ground by demonstrating the existence of stem cells by creating the first quantitative clonal method for identifying them. By establishing the...

  • The past year was dominated by the entwined themes of communications and outreach, as our organization staked out new frontiers in its prospective profile among the membership as well as the general public. The centrepiece of this activity was the 35th Anniversary edition of Future Health, which consisted entirely of 35 original research stories provided by a specially selected external editor...

  • Researchers in Newfoundland have cracked the genetic code of a sudden death cardiac killer.  The excitement among cardiologists concerns a rare genetic condition - arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC).

    As a result, they have developed a unique prevention program in which people with no symptoms, but with a suspect gene and a family history, are being implanted with...

  • If the passage of 35 years marks a full generation, then Canadians for Health Research is pleased to visit this milestone as an organization that has withstood the passage of time.  In some respects, little has changed. People in this country certainly value the principles and the promise of health care as much as they did a generation ago. But the everyday discussion of research material has...

  • While we hope you find this current issue of Future Health provides the usual dose of compelling reading, we would also like to give you some advance notice about the next two issues of the publication. By way of marking the 35th anniversary of Canadians for Health Research, we have assembled a team with some of the country’s leading medical writers, who will be examining leading issues in a...

  • According to researchers from from Université Laval’s Faculty of Medicine and the CHUQ Research Center, it may be possible to repair the defective gene that causes Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The team, led by Professor Jacques P. Tremblay, recently published their new therapeutic approach in the online version of Gene Therapy.
    Duchenne muscular dystro­phy is a hereditary...

  • A new study from The Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (The Neuro) at McGill University is the first to discover a molecular link between Parkinson’s disease and defects in the ability of nerve cells to communicate. The study, published in the prestigious journal Molecular Cell and selected as Editor’s Choice in the prominent journal Science, provides new insight into the...

  • Scientists from the BC Cancer Agency have discovered a never-beforeseen DNA spelling mistake – or mutation – in a gene called EZH2 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma, the two most common types of non-Hodgkins lymphoma.

    This groundbreaking discovery, which was published online in the prestigious international science journal Nature Genetics, is particularly...

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